The Rise of New England Collegiate Smash

By Matthew “MattDotZeb” Zaborowski

August 24th, 2013

Everyone was abuzz at Mass Madness: Championship Edition, the final event of the New England Smash Summer Circuit. (NESS Circuit) With 70 entrants this was the largest event New England had seen in a long time. With Pro and Amateur brackets following the round-robin pools, everyone had an opportunity to show their stuff. Players from NYC, Long Island, even up-state New York came out to show their stuff to the best players in New England. After a long summer of events leading up to it, MMCE didn’t disappoint.

Thursday September 12th, 2013

Eric “Nuro” Lima posts about Game Over in the New England Melee group. This was a weekly gaming night in Harvard Square, previously unheard of except to maybe a select few. Utilizing facebook and r/smashbros to advertise, players came out the following Tuesday with three or four setups into the bottom floor of Tommy Doyles Irish Pub & Restaurant’s defunct Harvard Square location and had a fun smashfest with some drinks. Boston had never had an event in a bar, so this was quite the treat.
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Smash The Record: A Charity Event

To continue community week, we highlight Central Florida Smash who is running an event for charity

On August 22nd in Orlando, Florida, #SmashTheRecord will be a Guinness World Records charity melee marathon for “Longest Video Games Marathon Playing a Fighting Game.” The event will be streamed by VGBootCamp while being featured on the front page of Twitch.tv each day of the event!
smashtherecord2014

Gaming Knights will be playing for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital during the weekend to break the current record of 48 hours! Gahtzu, a GK team member and UCF student, will be playing for the record with the help of those attending the event!

With the help of the University of Central Florida, Gaming Knights were able to reserve a 5,000 square foot ballroom for the event, and aid players like Mang0, Mew2King, Soft out to the event and others like D1 and GimR too! Shortly after the event’s announcement, much attention was brought to the event, and shortly after, #SmashTheRecord made it over to the West Coast to attract HugS all the way to Florida!

If you would like to participate, help out or sponsor the event, please email Alex Chiricosta at cherry@knights.ucf.edu, or message him on Facebook at facebook.com/CherryFTW

Gamingknights

Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1409858159281792/

Smashboards Post: http://smashboards.com/threads/smashtherecord-guinness-world-record-marathon-ft-mango-hbox-m2k-d1-hugs-soft-orlando.351683/page-2#post-17277475

How to Cultivate Smash on a College Campus

by Susanna Yu

INTRO TO SLO (California Polytechnic State University, SLO) 

SLO Facebook

The SLO Smash Community Facebook group, established just 9 months ago, consists of 200 members, with new players being added each day. That doesn’t seem like much when you compare it to the Norcal or Socal Melee groups, but for a small city like San Luis Obispo that lies on the central coast of California, it isn’t too bad. Smashfests occur at least once or twice a week, and we even had our own “SloBroke Weeklies” with $1 entry fees happening every weekend before our official SLO Smash Club got established on the Cal Poly SLO campus just two months ago. Over the past year, we’ve hosted 3 large tournaments with about 50 participants each, and many smaller weeklies.

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Smash 4 Gameplay Impressions

by Larry “DEHF” Holland

Thoughts on Smash 4

Smash Invitational

I want to start off by saying a lot of what I’m about to say comes from watching people and the small amount of time I had to play the game at SDCC. Although I was able to play some 1v1 no item matches during the SDCC tournament, most of the matches I played were 4 player ffa with items on.

Game Mechanics

smash4

The best description I can give on how I felt the game played is a mix between Smash 64 and Brawl. One of the things that made me feel like it had a Smash 64 feel was the movement. Dashing in this game is a step above Brawl, one of the obvious reasons being you no longer have a chance of tripping. You can also stop your dash animation by shielding like you can do in Smash 64 and Melee. I believe this will add a lot quick weaving in and out of characters ranges through dash.

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Weekly Wrap Up (8/12/2014)

Another Weekly Wrap Up! If you’d like your tournament to be featured, fill out this form in the future.!

Mayhem (227 Singles Entrants) – 8/9/2014, San Gabriel, CA

Mayhem is a Melee and Project M LOCAL in SoCal. There was 317 Unique entrants, 227 in Melee, and 173 in PM, with 94 entering both. All this done in 1 day. This is double our previous largest event. Player register ahead of time and pay at the venue. We took over 200 payments in under 90 minutes. The venue opened to the public at 11:00am. Melee finished a little after 1:00am and PM finished a little after 1:30am.
We had special out of state guess Hungrybox come out before moving back to Florida. He wasn’t the reason so many people came out (though i’m sure it helped). Post EVO hype and SoCal not having an SSS or Mayhem since EVO helped boost numbers to INSANE amounts. There were many new players and it was the 1st tournament for many. Overall heard many positive things from these new players and they seemed to enjoy themselves.
Make sure you don’t miss out on the next Mayhem Oct 4th. Melee will be streamed on twitch.tv/mikehazegaming

Singles Results
1. Crs Hungrybox
2. Lucky
3. Westballz
4. S2j

Full Results here
Videos here

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Something From Nothing: How One Tiny Smash Community Grew Their Scene

by Fuel

About the Author

fuel

Fuel is a medical student at the Memorial University of Newfoundland by day, and a prominent commentator, tournament organizer, and community leader for the Smash scene in New Brunswick, Canada by night. You can contact him at smashnewbrunswick@gmail.com or join the Smash New Brunswick community online at http://www.facebook.com/groups/hubcitysmash. Smash New Brunswick streams weekly on Thursday/Friday/Saturday at http://www.twitch.tv/smashnb.


When eight people showed up for the first Smash tournament I ever organized and five people showed up the week after, I was ready to quit.

After spending a month planning and organizing, asking more experienced TOs for advice, preparing the venue, acquiring a stream setup, and working the social media angles, I figured I had it in the bag. I knew what would work and what wouldn’t. I had backup equipment prepared for every possible accident. The one thing I hadn’t prepared for was the possibility that no one would show up.

After handing the tournament champion his grand prize of $5 in psychedelic Canadian space money, I felt discouraged. It seemed like I had put so much effort into something that I wanted desperately to work, only to discover that it either didn’t work as well as I had hoped or others didn’t share my dream.

five_dollars

The dream, of course, was to “be eSports now.” In the past few months, there have been a fair number of posts on both Melee It On Me and r/smashbros about how to build up local communities, and being from a fairly small community in Atlantic Canada, these articles really resonated with me. In most matters, my home province of New Brunswick has always been the sleepy, boring cousin to its industrious neighbour, Nova Scotia, and to the merry northern island of Newfoundland, and Smash is no exception. Halifax, Nova Scotia is not only Atlantic Canada’s largest city, but it also has the largest Smash community in the region, drawing over fifty or sixty people to its monthlies. You would think that the b’ys up in St. John’s, Newfoundland, who are isolated from the rest of Atlantic Canada not only by distance but also by a prodigious amount of water, would be struggling to build up their community, but they’re currently attracting over forty people to their PM weeklies (even just for friendlies!) and over fifty players to their monthly tournaments. New Brunswick, by comparison, was struggling to reach half those numbers during the first half of 2014, and our events occurred far less frequently. Continue reading